2023 Sewing Goals

Do you set Sewing Goals? How about New Year’s Resolutions?

I’m not a particularly good goal setter. I tend to go with the flow and decide on a course or objective as needed. When I was in my teens, I frustrated the guidance counselor because I had no timeline for an undergraduate degree followed by a graduate degree or professional certification. I just jumped into whatever landed on my plate and went in that direction. Note that this has made my life quite varied and fun, but maybe not as ‘accomplished’ as it could be!

Once I started sewing, I realised that it was not only fun but also rewarding to set goals for my sewing practice. So in 2018, I did a Ready to Wear Fast (there’s a page up top), and then in 2019 I started setting goals to develop particular skills, like welt pockets.

Those welt pockets stayed on the list until 2022 when I finally did a couple and I suppose I can check that off the list now because I can do one with instructions in front of me.

So what for 2023?

Over the holidays, I thought a lot about what challenges I wanted to set for myself for 2023. A regular feature on my YouTube channel is sharing monthly sewing challenges. Reading through the year-long challenges and what others are planning was fun but setting a goal of nine particular garments isn’t really of interest to me. I don’t feel like there are nine things I need/want at this moment.

Instead, I found a couple of things that are more my speed.

The We All Sew Blog by Bernina offered a printable checklist for Sewing Goals (available here). It’s a manageable list with space for 3 projects, 3 techniques and a few other general categories. It was easy to select just three things.

Top 3 Projects:
  1. Perfect Pants (that’s perFECT, not perfect) – Continue on the Top Down Centre Out method route with the goal of ending the year with well-fitting patterns for wovens (with pockets) and knits (for casual).
  2. Do a pattern destash! How have I wound up with hundreds of patterns?
  3. Continue working on my wardrobe of ‘elevated casual’ basics.
Top 3 Techniques to Learn/Try:
  1. Linings – I would like to learn how to add a lining to anything. PLUS, learn to line woven trousers. A pair of lined, wool trousers is almost essential for this climate.
  2. Applique – for craft and home dec sewing. I took a class a few years ago but I’m afraid it didn’t stick.
  3. Zippers – the other night I watched the Great British Sewing Bee and several of the contestants added zippers without any problems, all while under the pressure of the contest. I want to be able to do that!
Sewing Challenges

In terms of sewing challenges for the year, I’m trying to balance time sewing with thinking that everything I sew needs to be showcased here, on Instagram or on my channel. We all love to show off what we’ve made, especially if we don’t have sewing friends in real life. But it can become a burden. I’m not going to promise to do (or not do) anything but will instead see how I feel and if I’m placing undue pressure on myself just for an internet contest.

That said, there is one challenge that really spoke to me and I am committing to this one – Sew Thoughtful – which is an IG weekly challenge that is intended to take a gentler approach to sewing. Instead of focusing on production, you set intentions for the week and think back on past projects.

I am trying to generally be more mindful in life, and to really be present when I sew. Maybe I won’t have to rip out so many seams if I actually focus on my sewing instead of having squirrel! moments.

If you would like to follow along and are on Instagram, search for #sewthoughtful hosted by @SewLttleTime

What are your plans? Have you set any sewing goals for yourself?

3 thoughts on “2023 Sewing Goals

  1. Instead of fussing with a separate lining for each pair of wool pants, how about some pettipants? A rayon/silk liner, constructed as some outer pants but without any details like fly, pockets, waistbands. Just use a lingerie elastic at the waist, and cut off anywhere between calf and ankle. Serging is a fine finish, you can serge seams to the outside if you want as they will face the pants. Saves you labor and materials as 2 of them can cover your entire pant collection. Saves your pants as not only are they protected but they don’t need nearly as much cleaning.

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